Welcome to the Bygones Home Page. Bygones is a freeware software program designed to enter and keep genealogical research notes on a laptop or desktop computer. Bygones is available as freeware for Windows 95/98/me/XP/NT and Macintosh 8.1+ computers.

The current version of Bygones is .9d. It is a full working program, but it does not include any technical support; and only some rough drafts of the first few chapters of the manual are currently available. There is a Bygones Users Mailing List you can submit questions to. (If you have Bygones .9c or earlier, go to the Upgrade web page for information on how to upgrade.)

Table of Contents

---Introduction to Bygones---
Quick Overview of Bygones
Slideshow Overview of Bygones
Overview of Bygones Databases
---Using Bygones---
Bygones Tutorials
Using Multiple Research Folders
Quick Start
Bygones and Genealogical Filing Systems
---Installing Bygones---
System Requirements
Installing Bygones on a Window Computer
Installing Bygones on a Macintosh Computer
Fonts Required to Use Bygones
Accessing and Printing the Bygones User's Manual
Updating From Previous Versions of Bygones
Deleting (Uninstalling) Bygones
---Downloading Bygones---
Bygones License
Download Section
Links
---Mailing Lists---
Bygones Mailing Lists

Other Bygones Web Pages
Bygones Upgrade Web Page
Bygones Users Mailing List
Bygones Users Database Sharing Page

Introduction to Bygones

Quick Overview of Bygones

Bygones is a computerized genealogical note-keeping system in computer database form, for genealogists with laptop or desktop computers. If you have a laptop or desktop computer available where you do research, you can record your genealogical research notes on your computer as you do your family history research. In addition to the Research database for entering research notes, Bygones also has databases which may be used for related purposes, such as: creating an "index" of the information in your research notes, keeping track of genealogical correspondence and correspondents, creating time lines for your families, creating to do lists of pending research tasks, entering information on sources that are important for your family history research, entering information on the localities you do research in, entering spelling variations and soundex codes for your surnames, and for entering scanned maps, scanned family pictures, and scanned documents.

Bygones does not replace your lineage-linked genealogy program (Legacy, Family Origins, PAF, The Master Genealogist, Generations, Reunion, Ancestral Quest, Brother’s Keeper, Ultimate Family Tree, Family Tree Maker, etc.); rather it is meant to be used in conjunction with your lineage-linked genealogy program. It does replace paper-only genealogical note keeping forms, such as paper research logs and research extracts, correspondence logs, etc. with computer versions of these forms (which can be printed out for your paper files).

In gratitude to the many other members of the genealogical community who have volunteered their time, talents, and resources to further family history research, Bygones is distributed as FREEWARE. Please note, however, that Bygones does not include any technical support. Please look for the answers to your questions in the manual, that can be downloaded from the "Download" section on this web page below, or ask your questions to fellow Bygones users via the Bygones Users Group mailing list, also mentioned below.

To use Bygones, you fill out a research extract in a Bygones Research database on your computer for each search you do. When you are at home, you can print out your research extracts, as well as research logs that Bygones will generate for you from the information in your research extracts. You can then file your research extracts and logs, along with your document photocopies, in your paper genealogical files.


Figure 1: Bygones Research Extract


Figure 2: Bygones Research Log

The advantages of keeping your family history research notes in Bygones, as opposed to a paper-only based note-keeping system, are:

  1. It offers an efficient method of note keeping. Most people with computers can type quicker than they can write. Plus Bygones can speed up inputting data by giving you some default text in many of the fields of your research extracts. Bygones can also paste citations and information on sources you frequently use into your research extract for you, each time you use that source, so that you do not have to type the same citation and source information again each time you use the source.
  2. You can use the find (search) and sort features of Bygones to harness the power of your computer when you are searching, sorting, and analyzing your research notes. This is usually much, much faster than searching and sorting your paper notes. Every single name, locality, and word you type into Bygones is searchable.
  3. You can cut and copy information, such as source citations, document extracts, etc. from Bygones into your lineage-linked database program, word processor program, etc., without having to manually retype or rewrite the information. You can also copy information into Bygones from electronic catalogs and sources.
  4. You can view and print your research notes in several formats after you have input the information only once. After you have entered information on a search into a research extract in a Bygones Research database, you can view or print that data as a full research extract, in a regular research log, in a chronological (by event date) research log, in a locality-event type research log (grouped by locality and event type, as all Salt Lake County Marriage searches being grouped together, etc.), or to document source labels (address labels with your filing references and source citations) for your photocopies.
  5. You can take and create a lot of research notes with you on your research trips with a laptop, without having to lug around large paper files.

Slideshow Overview

Click on the link below to view a slideshow overview of Bygones (your monitor should be set to a resolution of 600x800 or greater to view the slideshow):
Introductory Slideshow Overview of Bygones.

Overview of Bygones Databases

Bygones includes a) a database program (the Bygones program, which is a FileMaker Pro 5.0 Runtime database program that will work only with the Bygones databases), b) a set of databases that hold various groups of information or data that you may want to keep track of in your genealogical note-keeping system, and c) the Bygones documentation.

Many of the Bygones databases are "related" and work together and share information with each other. The use of many of them is optional. But at minimum, you should be familiar with and use the Research database, which is the main database of Bygones, and the supporting databases it uses: the Sources, Locality, RecTypes, LogFiles, and, depending on your filing system, the DocFiles database.

Below is a brief overview of the Bygones databases, and their functions.

Database

Function

Research

This is the main database of Bygones. Use it to enter, analyze, and print your research notes. For each genealogical search you do, fill out a research extract record in this database. Then you view and print your research notes as research extracts, in research logs, or as document labels to put on your photocopies. You can use the "find" (search) and sort features of Bygones to help you analyze your notes. And you can copy and paste source extracts and citations from this database into your other genealogy programs.

Sources

Use this database to enter information on sources that you use, or plan to use in the future. The Research database can "look up" source citations and other information from this database, and paste it in a research extract each time you search that source.

Locality

Use this database to enter the names of localities your ancestors lived in. You may also enter creation dates, and other information about the locality in this database, if you would like. The locality names you enter here will appear in pop-up menus for "Locality" fields in other Bygones databases.

RecTypes

Use this database to enter your categories of record types (births, censuses, land records, marriages, etc.).

Contacts

Use this database to enter the names and information on: 1) repositories that you do research at, and 2) individuals and offices that you correspond with for your genealogy.

LogFiles

Use this database to enter the names of the files or categories that you keep and file your research logs by. Each research extract record you enter into the Research database must be assigned to a research "Log File." And when you print research logs from the Research database, they will print out according to the file name entered in the "Log File" field. If you file document photocopies in the same folders as your research logs,the "Log File" name will also indicate the file document photocopies have been filed in.

DocFiles

If you a) keep and file your research logs by one system of categorization (e.g., by family group or surname), and then b) file your document photocopies be a second system of categorization (e.g., by surname and record type, as in a Haselman/Census folder), then you should use the DocFiles database to enter the names of the files and categories that you keep your document photocopies in. If you keep your research logs and your document photocopies in the same set of files, you should not use the DocFiles database, or the "Doc. File" fields in the Bygones database. Rather, you should use the "Log File" field to refer to the files you keep and file your research logs and document photocopies in.

Index

You can use this database to index every name and event that you have recorded in your Research databases and folders. If you don't use this database, you can use the "find" feature of Bygones to search every name and word you enter in your databases. However, the index database can print alphabetical and chronological lists of every name and event that you have entered into it. So it can be a powerful tool to stay on top of every piece of genealogical information you have.

People

Use this database to enter the names and information on people you will index in the Index database. The Index database can then "look up" the names and information on these people when you index them, so that you don't have to retype their names each time you index and event for them.

TimeLine

Use this database to create time lines for families or individuals. It can copy much of the information it needs from your Research databases.

Scans

Use this database to keep scanned images of your documents in Bygones. It will look up the citation information it needs from your Research databases.

Corresp

Use this database to keep track of your genealogical correspondence. After you have received a reply, you can easily copy information from this database into a Research database if you would like, so that the information from that correspondence will appear on an appropriate research log. Note that this database can look up names and addresses from the Contacts database, so that you do not need to retype a person's name and address each time you write to them.

FormLtrs

Use this database to enter the basic text of generic "form letters" that you use. For example, a letter to request a death certificate, etc. Then, when you write the actual letter (from the Corresp database), the basic text of these letters will be pulled into the Corresp database, where you can modify the letter to your specific request.

Maps

Use this database to hold scanned maps for you to refer to while you are doing research. The maps in this database can also be viewed from within the Locality database.

ToDoList

Use this database to make To Do Lists of tasks or research objectives you need to complete. For example, "Find when and where John Smith married Sue Jones." However, if you are entering a list of specific searches to do (e.g., "check the 1887-1987 Salt Lake Co., Utah Marriage Index at the Family History Library for the marriage of John Smith to Sue Jones"), use a Research database to enter them. Then, when you get to that repository, you can bring up the research extract records for your pending searches, and finish filling them out when you complete the searches.

Surnames

Use this database to enter the Soundex codes and alternate spellings for your ancestral surnames.

GivnName

Use this database to enter general nicknames and foreign variations of given names. A nickname or foreign name variation for a specific ancestor, should be entered in your lineage-linked genealogy program rather than this database.

Topics

Use this database to enter information on general genealogical topics, that do not apply to one specific source. For example, if you found a good article on the religious rites of a religion, or the naturalization laws of a country, etc., you may want to enter it here.

Pictures

Use this database to enter and keep track of digitized family pictures.

PictIndx

Do not enter data into this database. The Pictures database uses this database to create name indexes to your pictures.

Manual

This database contains the text of the Bygones Manual. It can easily be referred to and searched while you are using Bygones, and is like the "help" file for Bygones. Note, however, that it doesn't contain any of the illustrations that are found in the PDF (portable document format file) version of the Manual.

Start

This is an empty database that is used as a starting point when you initially start Bygones.

TempLabl

This is a database that the Research databases sometimes uses to create document labels for your photocopies. You should not enter data directly into this database.

PopUps

This database holds the values for some pop-up lists in the Bygones databases. You can customize those pop-up lists by editing them in this database.

Users

This database holds the addresses for the users whose research is held in Bygones. If a person moves, changing their address in this database causes it to be changed where ever their address is displayed in Bygones.

Using Bygones

Bygones Tutorials

Below are some links that will start some slide show tutorials that teach you how to use Bygones. You will need to have your computer monitor set to a resolution of 800 x 600 or greater to view these tutorials, and your browser will need to be set up to run java applets.

Introductory Slideshow Overview of Bygones

Using the Research Database Part I: Entering Genealogical Research Notes
Using the Research Database Part II: Viewing and Printing Research Notes
Using the Research Database Part III: Searching or "Finding" Research Notes
Using the Research Database Part IV: Optional Indexing of Research Extracts

Bygones & Filing Systems Part I: Fields and Printouts for Paper Files
Bygones & Filing Systems Part II: Sample Filing Systems

Using Multiple Research Folders

The Bygones databases are organized into two groups. The first are the "common" databases, of which you should only have one copy. These databases are located in the Bygones folder, and should not be moved, renamed, or put in any subfolders. The names of theses databases are listed below.

Common Databases in the Bygones Folder
Contacts.byg
DocFiles.byg
FormLtrs.byg
GivnName.byg
Locality.byg
LogFiles.byg
Manual.byg
Maps.byg
Pictures.byg
PictIndx.byg
PopUps.byg
RecTypes.byg
Sources.byg
Start.byg
Topics.byg
Users.byg.

Databases in the Research Folders

The other group of databases is located in the "Research Folders." You may enter all of your research notes into one large Research database, or you may make multiple copies of the Research folder if you would like to divide your research into separate databases. But when you make copies of the Research folder, you should do so by making a copy of a whole Research folder, with all the databases in it. To do this, you should use your operating system software (Windows or MacOS) to make a new copy of the "Blank Rsrch" folder, then give it a new descriptive name, such as "Paternal Research," etc. For example, with Windows, right click on the "Blank Rsrch" folder, and select the "Copy" command. Then right click in a blank spot of the Bygones Window, and select the "Paste" command. Then right click on the "Copy of Blank Rsrch" folder, and select the "Rename" command, and rename it appropriately. With the Mac OS, click on the "Blank Rsrch" folder once, and then choose the "Duplicate" command from the "File" menu. Then, to rename the copy, click on the name for the new "Blank Rsrch copy" folder, and leave the cursor over the name until the highlighting changes on the name, and the cursor turns into an "I" beam; and enter the new name for the folder. The names of the Bygones databases that are in the Research folders are listed below.

Corresp.byg
Index.byg
People.byg
Research.byg
Scans.byg
Surnames.byg
TempLabl.byg
TimeLine.byg
ToDoList.byg

You should not move databases out of a Research folder into the Bygones folder, or visa-versa.

Note that under Windows, all Bygones databases need to have the ".byg" extension for them to work with the Bygones program. However, depending how a user’s options are set in Windows, your computer may or may not actually display these extensions. Macintosh computers don’t actually need the ".byg" extension on their files, but if they ever want to share their research files with Windows users, or use their databases on a Windows computer, they should leave those extensions on for cross-platform compatibility. Note that in the manual and on this web page, the databases are usually referred to by their names without the .byg extension.

Since each Research subfolder will contain databases with the same names (Research, Index, etc.), you should only open and work with the databases in one Research folder at a time. When you want to close a Research database and all the other opened databases in the same Research folder, you can use the "Close All Research Folder Databases" in the "Open" menu of a Research database to do so. Then you can use the "Open File" command in the "Open" menu to open the Research database you want to work with. The "Close All Research Folder Databases" command is only available when you are in a Research database.

Although you can give the Research folders descriptive names, as "Paternal Research," "Haselman Research," etc., note that YOU SHOULD NOT RENAME ANY OF THE BYGONES DATABASES. If you do, the databases may not work together properly (their relationships may be broken), and some of the buttons in the databases, and some of the commands (scripts) in the "Open" menu may not work properly.

Quick Start

Before you spend much time using Bygones, you should be familiar with several underlying topics.

First of all, you should understand what database fields and records are. A field holds a specific piece of information, such as a date, name, etc. A database record contains a set of related fields. For example, in a lineage-linked database genealogy program, an "individual record" may contains fields for the surname, given name, birth date, birth place, death date, and death place for one person. In the Bygones Research database, each Research Extract you fill out creates one database record in your Research database.

Next, you should understand what a FileMaker Pro/Bygones "layout" is, and how you use them. In a FileMaker Pro/Bygones database, a layout is an interface, form, and/or screen that you use to a) enter and edit your records, b) browse or review your records, c) perform a "find" (search) of your records, and d) print out your records. The layouts themselves do not hold the records, they are merely the interfaces you use to access and work with your database records. Each database can have multiple layouts, showing different fields of your records, or the same fields arranged in different ways. For example, in the Research database, the Research Extract layouts show all the information about a search. But there are also Research Log layouts which only show a few fields from each record, in order to summarize many searches on one page.

Next, you should understand the basics of navigating in the Bygones databases, to get to the databases, records, and layouts you wish to work with. Use the "Open" menu to open and close various databases. Use the "Windows" menu to quickly switch between the databases that are currently opened. To switch between various layouts in a database, use the layout pop-up menu in the upper left hand corner of the gray "status area" of your Bygones Window. (If the gray "status area" isn't visible, click on the status area control icon in the lower left hand corner of your Bygones Window to display it.)


Figure 3: A Bygones Window with "Status Area"

For example, if you are doing some genealogical research, and wish to enter your research notes into a Bygones Research database, you should first use the "Open File" command to open a Research database. Once you are in that database, you should use a Research Extract layout to enter your research notes. So, use the layout popup menu to switch to a Research Extract layout within that database. You can then enter your research notes. If you want to view or print your research data in a research log format, switch to a research log layout within the Research database, by again using the layout popup menu in the gray status area. Many Bygones layouts also have buttons to switch between various layouts and databases.

To switch between different records in your databases, click on the index card "book" in the upper-left hand corner of the gray "status area." Clicking on the index cards will switch records one at a time. To quickly move between many records, drag the "bookmark" bar next to the index cards. You may also perform a "find" to have Bygones quickly find the record(s) that match your search criteria. See chapter 7 of the Bygones Manual, "Using the Bygones (FileMaker Pro Runtime) Database Program for more information.

You should also have a genealogical research note filing system in place or in mind before you enter many notes into Bygones, since some of the fields in the Research database refer to your genealogical files. Chapter 5 of the Bygones Manual, "Genealogical Filing Systems" briefly introduces some common filing systems for people who do not already have a research note filing system in place. You should also understand how Bygones is designed to work hand-in-hand with various filing systems. Chapter 6 of the Bygones Manual, "How to Use Bygones with Different Filing Systems," and the "Bygones and Genealogical Filing Systems" section on this web page below explains this.

Next, you should understand that "genealogical dates" and "localities" in Bygones databases need to be entered in a specific way for them to sort properly--from the largest to smallest levels. In FileMaker Pro databases, a regular date field must hold a full, exact date. It can not hold partial dates, or modifiers such as "about," "before," etc., that are often needed in what I think of as "genealogical dates." (For example, you can not enter "About Aug 1850" or even "Aug 1850" in a FileMaker Pro date field, since they are not full dates.) So, the fields in Bygones that hold "genealogical dates" in Bygones are actually text fields rather than date fields. That way, you can enter modifiers and estimated dates, etc. But, for the "text" dates to sort correctly in chronological order, you must enter genealogical dates in Bygones as: "YYYY/MM/DD modifiers." For example, "about June 4, 1846" would have to be entered as "1846/06/04 about" in Bygones. Note that you should always use two digits to refer to months and days. If you don't have a month or date, you can leave it off. For example, you could enter "1846/05 about," "1846/1847 about," or "1846-1847 between," etc.

Localities need to be entered with the largest locality level listed first, and then smaller localities next. For example, "Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah" would be entered in Bygones as "Utah, Salt Lake Co., Salt Lake City." Then, when you do sorts based on the locality field, the localities will be grouped into logical geographical groups. For example, if you entered Sacramento, California; San Francisco, California, and Salt Lake City, Utah in the proper manner, a sort based on the locality field would sort them as:
California, Sacramento,
California, San Francisco,
Utah, Salt Lake City.

But, if you entered them starting with the smallest locality first (e.g., Salt Lake City, Utah), the resulting sort wouldn't be organized well into geographical areas. It would come out as:
Sacramento, California,
Salt Lake City, Utah,
San Francisco, California.

If you understand the above concepts, you are ready to start using Bygones. To use Bygones:

  1. Install Bygones as directed in the next section.
  2. If you will be dividing and entering your research notes into separate research files, make a copy of the "Blank Rsrch" folder in you Bygones folder, and then rename the new research folder with a descriptive name, as "Paternal Rsrch," "Haselman Rsrch," etc. Do not rename any of the databases within the folder. If you want to enter all your research notes into one large database, you do not need to make a copy of the "Blank Rsrch" folder; simply use the existing "Main Research" folder to enter your notes into.
  3. Start Bygones by double clicking on the "Bygones" program icon in your Bygones folder. Bygones should start, and open up the "Start" database with the "Welcome to Bygones" layout.
  4. Click on the "Main Research DB" button if you will be entering your research notes in one large research database. If you created a new Research database to enter notes into in step 2, click on the "Open a Bygones File" button to navigate to, and open, the Research database in the new Research file you created. If you want to experiment with a Research database with some data already entered into it, open up the Research database in the "Haselman Rsrch" folder.
  5. Within the Research database, switch to one of the "Research Extract" layouts, if you are not already in one. Use the layout pop-up menu in the upper left hand corner of the gray "status area" to switch between layouts. If you can not see the gray "status area" on the left side of your screen, you will need to toggle it on by clicking on the status area control icon in the bottom left hand corner of your Bygones window. It is a little icon that looks like a computer window with a gray area on the left.
  6. When you are ready to enter a new research extract, click on the "New Extract" button, and start entering data. Note that when entering data, you will often have to switch between the Research database, and the related supporting databases: the Sources, Locality, RecTypes, Contacts, LogFiles, and, depending on your filing system, the DocFiles database. There are several ways to open these supporting databases. You may use the "Open File" command in the "Open" menu to open any one of them. The "Open" menu of the Research databases also have commands to open these specific databases. And, in the Research Extract layouts, the small round buttons open up related database files. For example, the small round button next to the "Log File" field in the Research Extract layouts of the Research databases will open the LogFiles database. Once you have opened the various databases, you can quickly switch between them using the "Windows" menu.
  7. When you want to print out a Research Log of the genealogical searches you have done and entered, switch to one of the "Research Log" layouts to do that. If you would like to print out document labels for your document photocopies, use one the "Document Labels" layouts. Be sure to check out the various layouts in the Research database and other databases to see the various ways you can view and work with your data.
  8. If you would like to index the data in your research databases, open the Index database and the People databases within your Research folders to do that. If you would like to create time lines for your families, open and use the TimeLine database to do that. If you would like to keep scanned images of your documents in Bygones, use the Scans database to keep them in. Use the ToDoList database to enter pending research objectives you want to accomplish. Use the Corresp database to keep track of your genealogical correspondence. In short, experiment with the Bygones databases, and see which ones you find helpful.

Bygones and Genealogical Filing Systems

Bygones is a genealogical note-keeping system. A genealogical note keeping system must work hand-in-hand with your genealogical research note filing system. So Bygones is designed so that it can work with a large variety of research note filing systems. However, the specific filing system you use is left up to you. Bygones does require that you have some research note filing system in place, however, that a) divides your research notes and document photocopies up into logical manageable groups or files; and that b) numbers your extracts and documents within those files, so that each extract and document may be referred to and quickly accessed by a) a file name, plus b) a document or extract number.

If you do not already have a filing system in place, you should decide upon one before you use Bygones, since some of the fields in Bygones refer to your genealogical files. The Bygones Manual includes a chapter which briefly introduces some common filing systems, for people who don't already have one in place. Another chapter explains in detail how Bygones is used with various filing systems.

The two primary research notekeeping forms/layouts in Bygones are the Research Extract and Research Log forms/layouts. In the Bygones note-keeping system, all searches, whether they are positive or negative, are recorded by filling out a research extract. Each research extract you fill out is assigned to a research log. A research log shows all the searches, both positive and negative, you have done for a family or surname, etc. When you switch to a research log layout in Bygones, you can select one research log file, and Bygones will create a research log showing all the searches that you have done that pertain to that research log category. Some common ways of grouping research logs are by nuclear families, by surnames, by surnames/localities, or by individuals.

Bygones assumes that all users will at least print and file:
1) Research Logs showing their positve and negative searches; and
2) Document Photocopies that have resulted from their positive searches.

The document photocopies may be filed with the research logs in the same set of files, by the same rules of division and categorization; or the document photocopies may be filed in a separate set of files, by a different set of rules for division and categorization. For example, if you keep your research logs organized by family groups, so that you can keep your research logs with your family group sheets, you may:
1) Also file your document photocopies according to the family group they apply to; or you may
2) File them in a separate set of "document files" that are divided and categorized by another set of rules, such as by record type (Censuses, Marriages, etc.), by surname/record-type (Haselman/ Censuses, etc.), by localities (Utah, Salt Lake Co.), etc.

Although Bygones is designed to work with a large variety of filing systems, it actually groups all different genealogical research note filing systems into two groups:

  1. The first group of filing systems are those that file a) research logs, which record both positive and negative searches, and b) document photocopies from positive searches, in the same set of files, and by the same rules of division and categorization. The Bygones Manual refers to these filing systems as "Unified Filing Systems." For example, if you keep your research logs and notes organized by family groups, and then you also file your document photocopies by the family groups they apply to, along with your research logs, Bygones would consider this a "Unified Filing System."
  2. The second group of filing systems are those that file their a) research logs, which again, record both positive and negative searches, in one set of files by one set of rules of division and categorization; and then b) file their document photocopies from "positive" searches in a different set of files, by a different set of rules of categorization. The Bygones Manual refers to these filing systems as "Dual Filing Systems." For example, if you keep your research logs organized by surname, but file your found documents by surname/record-type files (e.g., you file a census on a Haselman family in a Haselman/Census document file), Bygones would consider this a "Dual Filing System."

Users of both filing systems should use the "Log File" field in the Research databases (see figure one, the research extract, above) to refer to the files or categories that they keep their research logs organized by. For people who use a "unified filing system," this field will also indicate which file a document photocopy from a positive search is filed in. People who use a "dual filing system" should use the "Doc. File" field to enter the names of the files which will hold their document photocopies. They also need to use the Research Extract and Research Log layouts in the Research database that have "w/ Doc. File Name" in their names. Those are the layouts designed to be used by people who use a "dual filing system." People who use a "unified filing system" should not use the "Doc. File" field, or the layouts with with "w/ Doc. File Name" in their titles. Nor should they use the DocFiles database.

In Bygones, research extracts and document photocopies are always referred to by: a) a file name that they are kept in, together with b) a document or extract number, or document event date, that allows you to go right to a specific document or extract within the file.

In regards to numbering systems for your research extracts and document photocopies within your files:

  1. Bygones research extracts (which exist for positive and negative searches) should always be assigned, and referred to by a: (Research) Log File name + Extract Number.
  2. Document photocopies (which usually only are made for positive searches), on the other hand, may be referred to by a) either a "Log File" name (for people who use a "unified filing system") or a "Document File" name (for people who use a "dual filing system"); plus b) an extract number, document number, or document event date, as described below.

As mentioned earlier, in Bygones, you fill out a research extract record in a Research database for each genealogical search you do, irregardless of whether it is a positive or negative search. Each research extract you fill out is assigned to a (research) Log File, and given an extract number, which is a consecutive number for the research "Log File" that a research extract is assigned to. For example, if the last research extract I entered for my "Haselman, John b. 1878 & Lucy Banks" family research Log File was assigned extract no. 12, the next time I enter a research extract that is assigned to that research log file, I will assign it the extract no. 13. That way, each research extract you fill out can be referred to by a unique Log File name + Extract Number. The Bygones databases themselves also distinguish each of your research records/extracts by looking at the combined research Log File name + Extract number for each extract. Note that Bygones can usually determine the correct extract number for you.

In regards to the numbering system you use to refer to your document photocopies by within your folders, you may use one of three numbering systems with Bygones:

  1. You may keep and file your document photocopies by the extract numbers described above. If you print out and file all of your research extracts (including those for "negative" searches) along with your document photocopies, this may be a good numbering system to use to also refer to your document photocopies. Then you can simply interfile your document photocopies with the applicable research extracts. This numbering system should only be used to refer to document photocopies by people who use a "unified filing system." (People who use a "dual filing system" still use extract numbers to refer to their research extracts--but not to refer to their document photocopies filed in separate "document files.")
  2. You may use "document numbers" to number your documents within your folders. Document numbers are a consecutive number assigned to document photocopies according to the file they will be filed in (which can be the research log file for people who use a "unified filing system," or a document file for people who use a "dual filing system"). So, if the last document photocopy I had filed in my "Haselman, John b. 1878 & Lucy Banks" file had been assigned the document number 14, the next time a search resulted in a document photocopy being made for that file, I would assign it the document number 15. Of course, if a search does not result in a photocopy or extract being printed for filing, no document number is assigned. Both people who use a "unified filing system" or a "dual filing system" may use this numbering system. If you don't print out and file research extracts from your negative searches (the negative searches will still be noted on your Research Logs from Bygones), this is a good numbering system to use.
  3. Or, you may use the "event date" of the document to file and refer to it by, rather than by a document or extract number. So, if you have a census that was recorded on April 6, 1910, you would file that census in chronological order by that event date, within the folder it belongs to.

So, with Bygones, you may refer to your document photocopies by any one of the following five file name + number combinations, depending on your filing system and preferred numbering system:

1) (Research) Log File + Extract Number,
2) (Research) Log File + Document Number,
3) (Research) Log File + Event Date,
4) Document File + Document Number,
5) Document File + Event Date.

People who use a "unified filing system" can pick from any one of the first three systems to refer to their document photocopies by; and people who use a "dual filing system" can pick from one of the last two.

In the Bygones Research databases, there are five fields that can be used to make the Bygones note-keeping system work hand-in-hand with your genealogical filing, and document numbering, system. These five fields are:

1) The "Log File" field;
2) The "Doc. File" field;
3) The "Extract No." field;
4) The "Doc. No. or Copies" field, and
5) The "Event Date or Search Period" field.

See figure one on this web page for an illustration of these fields.

All Bygones users, whichever filing system they use, should enter a research "Log File" name, and an "Extract Number" for each extract they fill out. All users should also enter an event date (for a positive search when you found a document) or a search period (the time period you checked for negative searches) in the "Event Date or Search Period" field. If you use document numbers, you should enter the document number in the "Doc. No. or Copies" field when a search results in a document photocopy being made. If a search didn't result in a document photocopy, enter "None" in this field. If you file your documents within your files by the extract number, or document event date, rather than document numbers, enter "Yes" or "None" in the "Doc. No. or Copies" field, to indicate whether a search resulted in a document photocopy being made. If you use a "dual filing system," you should enter then name of the document file you will file a document photocopy in into the "Doc. File" field. If you file your document photocopies in the same folders, and by the same method of organization, as you keep your research logs by (a "unified filing system"), you should not use the "Doc. File" field. Rather you should use the "Log File" field to refer to names of the files that you both a) keep and file your research logs by, and b) file your documents by.

Not that the Bygones Research database can print out document labels for you, which are address labels with a) a file name, b) an extract no., document no., or an event date, and c) a source citation printed on them. You can then put these labels on your photocopies so that you can quickly see what file they belong in, and the source citation for the document. Bygones can print out document labels by any one of the five combinations of a: a) file name, plus b) extract no., document no., or event date listed earlier.


Figure 4: Document Labels For Photocopies

Installing Bygones

System Requirements

The system requirements to run Bygones on a Windows computer are: Windows 95 or later (95/98/me/XP), or Windows NT. You will also need an Intel-compatible 486/33 or faster computer with at least 16 MB of RAM, and 20 MB of hard disk drive space for Bygones, plus additional hard drive space for your research files.

To run Bygones on a Macintosh computer, you will need a Macintosh, Power Macintosh, or compatible computer running System 8.1 or later, at least 16 MB of RAM, and 24 megabytes of hard disk space.

Installing Bygones on a Windows Computer

By installing and using Bygones, you agree to be bound by the terms of the Bygones license, the text of which is listed in the "ReadMe.txt" file that comes with Bygones, and in the "Bygones License" section later on this web page.

You may obtain a copy of Bygones from http://www.bygonessoftware.com/index.htm. The Windows version of Bygones comes in a self-extracting zip file, BygInstl.exe.

To install, or actually unzip, the Windows version of Bygones onto your hard drive, double click on the BygInstl.exe icon. Unzip its contents to a folder named Bygones on your hard drive. After you have unzipped it, open up the Bygones folder on your hard drive. Then double click on the "Bygones" icon to start Bygones. The first time you run Bygones, it will install some system files it needs. After it has installed those files, the Bygones database program will start, and open the "Start" database. The "Start" database is a blank database from which you can open the specific Bygones database you wish to work with. From the "Start" database, open the specific Bygones database you want to enter data into (usually a Research database), by either clicking on one of the "Open…" buttons in the Welcome layout/screen, or by selecting the "Open File" command from the "Open" menu. You will then be ready to start using Bygones.

If you need to install Bygones on a computer with only a floppy drive, and without an Internet connection, you may use WinZip or a similar program to 1) zip and "span" the BygInstl.exe file onto several floppy disks, 2) and then unzip (and recombine) the spanned file onto the hard drive of the computer you wish to install it on. You will then have the BygInstl.exe file on that computer, and can install it according to the instructions in the above paragraph. You can get a copy of WinZip from Nico Mak Computing’s website: http://www.winzip.com. For instructions on how to "span" a zip file onto several disks, open WinZip’s help index, then locate and double click on the word "spanning."

Note that installing/unzipping Bygones merely installs it onto your hard drive, in a Bygones folder. It does not place a shortcut to Bygones in Windows’ Start pop-up menu. You may do this yourself, however. For the specific instructions on how to do this, check the "help" file for your system. For example, in the help for Windows 95, under the index heading "Start Menu—adding programs to," it gives these instructions to add a program to the Start or Programs Menus:

1. Click the Start button, and then point to Settings.
2. Click Taskbar, and then click the Start Menu Programs tab.
3. Click Add, and then click Browse.
4. Locate the program you want to add, and then double-click it.
5. Click Next, and then double-click the menu on which you want the program to appear.
6. Type the name that you want to see on the menu, and then click Finish.
7. If Windows prompts you to choose an icon, click one, and then click Finish.

You may also create a shortcut to Bygones on your desktop if you would like. For example, under Windows 95, you can open up your Bygones folder on your hard drive, then right-click on the icon for Bygones.exe, select "Send To—Desktop as Shortcut."

Installing Bygones on a Macintosh Computer

By installing and using Bygones, you agree to be bound by the terms of the Bygones license, the text of which is listed in the "ReadMe.txt" file that comes with Bygones, and in the "Bygones License" section later in this chapter. Please review it before "signing" your name to it by installing Bygones.

You may obtain a copy of Bygones from http://www.bygonessoftware.com/index.htm. The Macintosh version of Bygones is distributed in a "stuffed" (compressed) file named BygInstl.sit. To unstuff (uncompress) it, you will need a program such as Aladdin System’s freeware StuffIt Expander program, their StuffIt shareware program, or their commercial StuffIt Deluxe program. Information on these programs may be obtained from their website at http://www.aladdinsys.com/expander/index.html.

If you are using the freeware StuffIt Expander program, simply drag the icon for BygInstl.sit on top of the icon for StuffIt Expander, and StuffIt Expander will uncompress Bygones. You should then have a Bygones folder on your hard drive.

Most Macintosh users will then need to install the Arial and Courier New TrueType font families into their system file. Bygones needs these two font families to properly display and print. Windows comes with these fonts, but most Macintosh computers do not have them. So, a freeware copy of these fonts is distributed with the Macintosh version of Bygones. If your Macintosh doesn’t already have these fonts (look in the Fonts folder of your System folder to determine whether or not you already have them), drag them from the Fonts folder in your Bygones folder, into the Fonts folder in your System Folder. (Note that the "Courier New" font is a different font than the "Courier" font that Macintoshes do have.) After initially dragging them into the System Folder, you will need to reboot your Macintosh in order for them to be loaded before you start Bygones for the first time. These font families can also be downloaded from http://www.microsoft.com/truetype/fontpack/mac.htm.

You may then open the Bygones folder, and double click on the Bygones icon. The first time Bygones runs, it will install some system files it needs, and then it should open up the "Start" database. The Start database is an empty database that is used as a launching database from which you can open the specific database(s) you wish to work with. In the Start database, click on one of the "Open…" buttons in the Welcome layout, or select the "Open File" command from the "Open" menu to open the database you wish to work with. You will then be ready to start using Bygones.

Fonts Required to Use Bygones

Bygones uses and needs two specific font families for its forms to appear and print correctly: the Arial and Courier New True Type font families. If your Bygones forms are printing with words overlapping, and/or not showing complete words, it is probably because you do not have these fonts, and your computer is substituting other fonts for them. Windows comes with these fonts, but most Macintosh computers do not have them. So, a freeware copy of these fonts is distributed with the Macintosh version of Bygones. Macintosh users who don’t have these fonts should drag them from the Fonts folder in their Bygones folder, into the Fonts folder in their System Folder. These font families can also be downloaded from http://www.microsoft.com/truetype/fontpack/mac.htm. Both Macintosh and Windows versions of these fonts can be downloaded from this site.

Accessing and Printing the Bygones User’s Manual

After you install Bygones, it is recommended that you open and print the Bygones User’s Manual. If you will be using Bygones, reading the applicable portions of the manual, and having it available in printed form to refer to when you have questions will help you quickly learn how to use Bygones. The Bygones User’s Manual comes in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, that can be opened, printed, and read with Adobe’s Acrobat Reader.

However, at this time, I am just starting to write the manual. You may download the latest draft at this website. (See the Download Section.)

Of course, you may also read the PDF Manual on your computer screen with the Adobe Acrobat Reader program if you prefer. Adobe’s Acrobat Reader is a freeware program that can be downloaded from their web site at http://www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html. (If they change this URL address, try their main page at http://www.adobe.com.) Many computers come with Acrobat Reader preinstalled, and it can also be found on many CD-ROMs for commercial software programs you may have bought, if the program included some documentation in PDF files.

If you do not already have Adobe’s Acrobat Reader installed on your computer, obtain it from one of the above sources and install it on your computer. Then, open up the "BygnsMan.pdf" file in the Bygones folder with Acrobat Reader. Then choose the "Print" command from the "File" menu of Acrobat Reader to print the Bygones User’s Manual. You may want to hole-punch the pages of the manual, and put it in a one inch 3-ring binder.

The text of the manual will also come in a Bygones database file (Manual.byg), which can be opened and read on your computer while using Bygones. This is an easy way to access the text of the manual while you are using Bygones on your laptop away from home. However, this version of the manual only includes the text of the manual, without any of the illustrations contained in the PDF version of the manual.

Updating From Previous Versions of Bygones

To upgrade from Bygones .9c or earlier to Bygones .9d, read the instructions on the Upgrade webpage.

Deleting (Uninstalling) Bygones

If you try Bygones, but decide to not use it, you can delete it by simply deleting the Bygones folder. Note that doing this will also delete the database files that you have entered data into, however.

Downloading Bygones

Bygones License

By using Bygones, you agree to be bound by the terms of the Bygones .9d Software License, a copy of which follows.

BYGONES .9d SOFTWARE LICENSE

Please read this license carefully before using this software. BY USING THIS SOFTWARE, YOU AGREE TO BECOME BOUND BY THE TERMS OF THIS LICENSE. If you do not agree to the terms of this license, do not use this software.

1. Ownership of Bygones Software.

The "Bygones" computerized genealogical note keeping software ("Software") consists of:

  1. The Bygones database structures or "solutions," and the accompanying documentation, which are owned and copyrighted by Troy Adair; and
  2. A FileMaker Pro Runtime Database Engine, and accompanying FileMaker Pro Tools, that are owned and copyrighted by FileMaker, Inc.

Bygones is distributed as "freeware." However, the "Bygones" computerized genealogical note keeping system software is licensed, not sold or given, to you by Troy Adair for use only under the terms of this License, and Troy Adair and FileMaker, Inc. reserve any rights not expressly granted to you in this license. You may own the media on which the Software is recorded or fixed, but Troy Adair and FileMaker Pro., Inc. retain ownership of their respective Software.

2. License.

This License allows you to:

(a) Use the Software. You are licensed to use the Bygones database structures on as many computers as you would like. You are licensed to use the integrated FileMaker Pro Runtime database engine only with the Bygones database structures. To "use" the Software means that the Software is either loaded in the temporary memory (i.e., RAM) of a computer or installed on the permanent memory of a computer (i.e., hard disk, etc.).

(b) You may give others a free copy of this Bygones Software, provided that you give them copies of it in its original zipped (or stuffed) form, which contains this license and other accompanying documents. The people you give copies of this software to must also agree to the terms of this license if they decide to use this software. Commercial distribution of this software is prohibited without a written license from Troy Adair.

3. Technical Support.

BYGONES DOES NOT INCLUDE ANY TECHNICAL SUPPORT. The user understands that he/she is responsible for finding the answers to his questions in the included documentation or through use of the Software.

4. Restrictions.

The Software contains trade secrets in its human perceivable form and, to protect them, you may not reverse engineer, decompile, disassemble or otherwise reduce the Software to any human perceivable form. You may not modify, adapt, translate, rent, lease, loan or create derivative works based upon this Software or any part thereof.

5. Termination.

This License is effective until terminated. This License will terminate immediately without notice from Troy Adair or judicial resolution if you fail to comply with any provision of this License. Upon such termination you must destroy the Software, all accompanying written materials and all copies thereof, and Sections 7, 8 and 9 will survive any termination. You may also terminate this license by destroying this Software, all accompanying printed materials, and all copies of it in your possession.

6. Export Law Assurances.

You agree that neither the Software nor any direct product thereof is being or will be shipped, transferred or re-exported, directly or indirectly, into any country prohibited by the United States Export Administration Act and the regulations thereunder or will be used for any purpose prohibited by the Act.

7. Disclaimer of Warranty.

This Software with its files and documentation are provided "AS IS" and without warranty of any kind. Troy Adair expressly disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.

8. Limitation of Remedies and Damages; Indemnification.

THE USER ASSUMES THE ENTIRE RISK OF USING THIS PROGRAM. Under no circumstances will Troy Adair or FileMaker, Inc. (or FileMaker, Inc.’s parent or subsidiaries or any of the licensors, directors, officers, employees or affiliates of any of the foregoing) be liable to you for any consequential, incidental, indirect or special damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for loss of business profits, business interruption, loss of business or family history information and the like), whether foreseeable or unforeseeable, arising out of the use of, or inability to use, the Software or accompanying written materials, regardless of the basis of the claim and even if Troy Adair or FileMaker, Inc. has been advised of the possibility of such damage. Because some states/jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages, the above limitation may not apply to you. By using Bygones, you agree to indemnify and hold Troy Adair and FileMaker, Inc. harmless from all claims, damages, losses, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable fees of attorneys and other professionals) arising out of, or in connection with, your use of this Software.

9. General.

This License will be construed under the laws of the State of Utah in regards to the Software owned by Troy Adair, and under the laws of the State of California in regards to the Software owned by FileMaker Pro., Inc., except for that body of law dealing with conflicts of law. If any provision of this License shall be held by a court of competent jurisdiction to be contrary to law, that provision will be enforced to the maximum extent permissible, and the remaining provisions of this License will remain in full force and effect. If the Software is supplied to the United States Government, the Software is classified as "restricted computer software" as defined in clause 52.227-19 of the FAR. The United States Government’s rights to the Software are as provided in clause 52.227-19 of the FAR.

FileMaker Pro is a trademark of FileMaker, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


Download Section

The current version of Bygones is .9d. This is a fully functional copy of Bygones, but the documentation for it has not been completed yet. If you find bugs or problems, or have suggestions for improving Bygones, please e-mail them to me at bygones@utah-inter.net.

Bygones .9d has a few sample searches in a folder called "Sample Rsrch." So, if you want to see how Bygones handles research notes/data, without having to enter data yourself, you can use experiment with the data in that folder.

The Windows version of Bygones comes in a self-extracting zip file, "BygInstl.exe" (4.48 MB). Download it from
http://www.bygonessoftware.com/BygInstl.exe. (Right-click on the link, and then choose the Save... command from the pop-up menu in your browser.) Follow the instructions on this web page to install it.

There are two Macintosh versions of Bygones. One for OS 8 & 9; and one for OS X.

Click here to download the OS 8/9 verion (requires Mac OS 8.1 or later): http://www.bygonessoftware.com/BygInstl.sit.
Click here to download the OS X version (requires Mac OS X 10.1 or later): http://www.bygonessoftware.com/BygXInst.sit.

Follow the instructions on this web page to install it. (Note to Macintosh Netscape users: unless you have already told Netscape how to handle ".sit"/stuffed files in Netscape's preferences, when you click on this link, you may get a confusing message that makes it sound like you need a plug in to download this file. However, if you just click on the "Save File" button that comes up in that window, it should download fine.)

I am in the process of writing a manual for Bygones. I only have drafts of the first few chapters so far. I will post updated copies here of the manual as I get more chapters written. When I finish the manual, I plan to include the manual with the Bygones program downloads. But, at this time, you will need to download it separately. Bygones does not include any technical support, so please download and refer to the manual when you have questions, or post your questions to the Bygones Users Mailing List.

The current working draft of the Bygones .9d Manual comes in a PDF (portable document format) file, that can be opened, read, and printed with Adobe's freeware Acrobat Reader. If you don't already have Acrobat Reader, you can download it from Adobe's website listed in the "Links" section below. Note that I am in the very early stages of writing a manual. So far, there are only beginning drafts of a few introductory chapters. I hope to now start writing chapters that address each database in detail. But at this point, you'll have to figure out most things by just playing around with Bygones. Thanks for your patience. To download the existing chapter drafts of the manual, right click on the link below (Macintosh users hold down the control button while you mouse click), and choose "Save Link As" (Netscape Navigator) or "Save Target As" (Microsoft Internet Explorer). Save the PDF file to your hard disk, and then use Adobe Acrobat Reader to open, read, and print it.
http://www.bygonessoftware.com/Nov99Man.PDF.

Links

Here are some links to other sites you may need.

The Windows version of Bygones comes in a self-extracting zip file. You should be able to unzip it without any additional software. However, you may also use other programs that can unzip files, such as WinZip or JustZIPit, to unzip it. JustZipit is freeware that can be dowloaded from http://free-backup-software.net. WinZip is shareware. You can also use WinZip to "span" the zip file onto several floppy disks, if you need to do that to get Bygones onto a laptop without an internet connection or high capacity removable drive. (Look in WinZip's help file under spanning for more information.) You can get a copy of it at the following website: http://www.winzip.com.

The Macintosh version of Bygones comes in a "stuffed" (compressed) .sit file. You will need a program that can "unstuff" stuffed files to unstuff the Macintosh version of Bygones. One such program is Aladdin Systems' freeware Stuffit Expander, which can be downloaded from their website at: http://www.aladdinsys.com/expander/index.html. The freeware Windows Aladdin Expander is also available at this website. Both of these freeware programs can uncompress many different file formats (zip, sit, etc.); but they can not create compressed files. Alladin Systems' StuffIt Light shareware program, and their commercial StuffIt Deluxe program, can also "segment" a file onto several floppy disks, if you need to install Bygones on a laptop without an internet connection or high capacity removable drive.

The Bygones Manual comes with Bygones in a portable document format (pdf) file which can be read and printed with Adobe's freeware Acrobat Reader. Many computers already have this program. If you don't already have it, you may download a free copy of it from their website at: http://www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html.

Bygones needs the Arial and Courier New True Type families to display and print correctly. Windows comes with these fonts, but Macintosh computers do not. The Mac version of Bygones comes with a freeware copy of these font families. But you may also download them from the following website: http://www.microsoft.com/truetype/fontpack/mac.htm.

Mailing Lists

Bygones Mailing Lists

Thanks for visiting this website; and thanks for trying Bygones! If you find any "bugs," or have suggestions for improving Bygones, please e-mail them to me at . Please remember that Bygones does not include any technical support, however.

There is a Bygones Users Mailing List, where users may discuss and help each other use Bygones.

Subscribing.
Clicking on one of the shortcut links below should work, but if your browser doesn't understand them, try these manual instructions: to join BYGONES-USERS-L, send mail to BYGONES-USERS-L-request@rootsweb.com with the single word subscribe in the message subject and body. To join BYGONES-USERS-D, do the same thing with mailto:BYGONES-USERS-D-request@rootsweb.com

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Last Updated: 10/3/2006